How many casinos are there in Las Vegas?

As of January 2017, there are 104 casinos in the city of Las Vegas, according to the Nevada Gaming Control Board. This represents more than one third of the 334 casinos licensed in the entire state of Nevada, and shows just why Vegas continues to hold the reputation of a global casino capital.

Today, while the Chinese peninsula of Macau has superseded Vegas in terms of raw income from gambling, Las Vegas is still North America’s largest casino economy, with more than $11.25bn revenue generated by casinos in 2016.

New projects and buildings emerge all the time, and many of the casinos in the four main areas of the city—the Strip itself, downtown Las Vegas, Boulder Strip, and North Las Vegas—are owned by the same entertainment groups or developers, many of whom also have interests in the booming gambling economy of Macau. For example, out of the all the casinos on the Las Vegas Strip, more than half are owned either by MGM Resorts International or Caesars Entertainment.

Of the 104 casinos in Las Vegas, forty are located on or close to the Las Vegas Strip. This is where the biggest and most exclusive resorts are, including the MGM Grand, The Rio, Hard Rock Casino, the Orleans, the Palms, the Bellagio, and the Gold Coast. Many of these resorts boast the latest in luxury accommodation, the most impressive shows, and other exciting draws.

For gamblers seeking a less expansive and arguably friendlier experience, the downtown area of Fremont Street offers lower limits and smaller venues, with twenty casinos to choose from as of January 2017. A further twelve casinos can be found in the North Las Vegas area, including classic veteran places such as Jerry’s Nugget, which opened in 1964. Again, these casinos offer lower minimums and a more personal experience than the Strip, but are perhaps a little less glamorous.

The Boulder Highway area, or Boulder Strip, has thirty-one casinos or casino resorts/hotels, and lies around seven to ten miles to the east of the Strip. This is where many locals come to gamble, and while you won’t find the massive stage shows, luxury resorts, or tourist traps of the Strip here, the Boulder Strip generates significant annual revenue from gambling, exceeding both North Las Vegas and downtown Vegas.

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